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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh fell into tens of thousands of dollars worth of credit card debt buying Washington Nationals baseball tickets over the past decade.

Kavanaugh, who is Trump's pick, also reported liabilities that exceeded the value of his total assets, according to financial disclosures released by the White House.

The disclosures were first reported by The Washington Post.   

Raj Shah, a White House spokesperson, told the Post that Kavanaugh accrued the debts buying up tickets for himself as well as 'friends'.

Season tickets to the Nationals, who play at Nationals Stadium in Washington DC, can cost up to $6,000 for all 81 home games - depending on the location of the seat.

According to disclosures filed for 2016, Kavanaugh reported accrued debt of between $60,000 to $200,000 spread out over three credit card accounts and a personal loan. 

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh fell into tens of thousands of dollars worth of credit card debt because of money he spent buying Washington Nationals baseball tickets over the past decade. Pictured above Wednesday before a meeting in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill 
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh fell into tens of thousands of dollars worth of credit card debt because of money he spent buying Washington Nationals baseball tickets over the past decade. Pictured above Wednesday before a meeting in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill 

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh fell into tens of thousands of dollars worth of credit card debt because of money he spent buying Washington Nationals baseball tickets over the past decade. Pictured above Wednesday before a meeting in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill 

Kavanaugh (center) serves macaroni and cheese to the homeless as he volunteers with Catholic Charities on W in Washington, DC
Kavanaugh (center) serves macaroni and cheese to the homeless as he volunteers with Catholic Charities on W in Washington, DC

Kavanaugh (center) serves macaroni and cheese to the homeless as he volunteers with Catholic Charities on W in Washington, DC

The Post reported that Kavanaugh incurred between $15,000 to $50,000 in credit card debt for each account as well as a Thrift Savings Plan loan between $15,000 to $50,000. 

In 2017, the credit card debts and loans were either paid off or fell below the reporting requirements. 

The White House says that his friends reimbursed him for the tickets and that the judge is no longer a Nationals season ticket subscriber.

In his most recent disclosure form, Kavanaugh reported relatively modest assets worth between $15,000 and $65,000.

If he is confirmed to the bench, it would make him one of the poorest justices on the Supreme Court.

Raj Shah, a White House spokesperson, told the Post that Kavanaugh accrued the debts buying up tickets for himself as well as 'friends,' who reimbursed him. The above image shows Mark Reynolds and Spencer Kieboom of the Nats during a game at Nationals Park in DC
Raj Shah, a White House spokesperson, told the Post that Kavanaugh accrued the debts buying up tickets for himself as well as 'friends,' who reimbursed him. The above image shows Mark Reynolds and Spencer Kieboom of the Nats during a game at Nationals Park in DC

Raj Shah, a White House spokesperson, told the Post that Kavanaugh accrued the debts buying up tickets for himself as well as 'friends,' who reimbursed him. The above image shows Mark Reynolds and Spencer Kieboom of the Nats during a game at Nationals Park in DC

With the exception of Clarence Thomas and Anthony Kennedy, all nine current justices on the Supreme Court have a net worth of at least $1.5million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.  

The judge has spent his entire career working in the public sector and also has a government retirement account worth almost $500,000 that also does not need to be disclosed, according to Shah.

'Judge Kavanaugh is a brilliant jurist who has dedicated his life to public service,' Shah said. 

Kavanaugh's home is not subject to disclosure. In 2006, Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley, bought a home for $1.2million, according to public records.

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In 2006, Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley, bought a home for $1.2million, according to public records. From left to right: Ashley Estes Kavanaugh; her daughters Margaret and Liza; Brett Kavanaugh; and President Donald Trump at the White House on Monday
In 2006, Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley, bought a home for $1.2million, according to public records. From left to right: Ashley Estes Kavanaugh; her daughters Margaret and Liza; Brett Kavanaugh; and President Donald Trump at the White House on Monday

In 2006, Kavanaugh and his wife, Ashley, bought a home for $1.2million, according to public records. From left to right: Ashley Estes Kavanaugh; her daughters Margaret and Liza; Brett Kavanaugh; and President Donald Trump at the White House on Monday

The Kavanaughs live in the upscale Washington, DC suburb of Chevy Chase, Maryland. The family home is seen in the above stock image
The Kavanaughs live in the upscale Washington, DC suburb of Chevy Chase, Maryland. The family home is seen in the above stock image

The Kavanaughs live in the upscale Washington, DC suburb of Chevy Chase, Maryland. The family home is seen in the above stock image

Since then, they have refinanced the home twice - most recently in 2015.

The current mortgage for the home is $865,000. 

Unlike the other justices on the Supreme Court, Kavanaugh has not worked in private practice, where it is easier to amass wealth as an attorney.  

Kavanaugh returned to Capitol Hill on Wednesday for a whirlwind round of meetings with key Republican senators as Democrats ramped up efforts to block his confirmation.

Kavanaugh, the conservative appellate court judge and President Donald Trump's choice to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, was meeting separately with at least five members of the Judiciary Committee. 

The panel will launch confirmation hearings later this summer.

Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, who had conferred with Trump on making his second pick for the court, called the Yale-educated judge 'a very fine man' and told reporters he expects Kavanaugh's confirmation to go well. 

'There will be the usual attempts to sully his reputation, not only in the Senate but outside the Senate, but he'll be able to handle it, and I have every confidence he'll be confirmed,' Hatch said.

Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch (left) of Utah, who had conferred with Trump on making his second pick for the court, called the Yale-educated judge 'a very fine man' and told reporters he expects Kavanaugh's confirmation to go well
Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch (left) of Utah, who had conferred with Trump on making his second pick for the court, called the Yale-educated judge 'a very fine man' and told reporters he expects Kavanaugh's confirmation to go well

Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch (left) of Utah, who had conferred with Trump on making his second pick for the court, called the Yale-educated judge 'a very fine man' and told reporters he expects Kavanaugh's confirmation to go well

But Kavanaugh has an unusually long paper trail for senators to review, including judicial rulings and documents from his tenure in the George W. Bush administration and on Kenneth Starr's investigation of President Bill Clinton. 

Aides say it could take weeks to assemble those materials.

Democrats, as the Senate minority, have few options to block Kavanaugh. 

But they can use the time to make the case that confirming Kavanaugh will tilt the court too far to the right. 

They warn that Kavanaugh could be part of majority decisions rolling back women's access to abortion and undoing aspects of the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats are also raising red flags over Kavanaugh's past writing that suggests investigations of sitting presidents are a distraction to executive branch leadership.

They see that as concerning amid the special counsel's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and Russian ties to the Trump campaign.

'The American people should have their eyes wide open to these stakes,' said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., the minority leader. 

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Year: 2018
Post: Admin

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